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San Francisco Mayor on Board Recall: We Failed Our Children

San Francisco Mayor London Breed listens during a news conference Oct. 2, 2018, in San Francisco. Eric Risberg / Associated Press

San Francisco Mayor London Breed listens during a news conference Oct. 2, 2018, in San Francisco.   Eric Risberg / Associated Press

San Francisco Mayor London Breed listens during a news conference Oct. 2, 2018, in San Francisco. (Eric Risberg / AP Photo)

OAN Newsroom
UPDATED 7:50 AM PT – Monday, February 21, 2022

Following a recall of three members on San Francisco’s School Board, the city’s mayor said they failed it’s children and became distracted by politics. During an interview on NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday, Mayor London Breed said the board members were not doing their fundamental job.

“In this particular case, the board neglected their primary responsibility to focus on other things,” she stated. “Other things that are important, but not as significant as what they were there to do and that is to educate children…parents were upset, the city as a whole was upset and the decision to recall school board members was a result of that.”

The recall effort came amid controversy regarding extended coronavirus shutdowns of schools and the board members’ attempts to rename 44 schools they said honored figures promoting racism, including George Washington and Abraham Lincoln among several other progressive policies.

“They are so egregiously incompetent so we need to get them out now and we have the voters have spoken,” said recall supporter Paulina Fayer.

Former School Board President Gabriela Lopez previously blamed white supremacy for her losing her post while claiming she was punished for fighting for racial justice.

However, the Democrat mayor said they have failed the city’s children. Breed highlighted this is not a political issue, but an issue about education. She added, at the end of the day kids were not in school when they should have been.

“I’m going to be looking for people that are going to focus on the priorities of the school district and not on politics, and not on what it means to run for office and stepping stones,” Breed explained. “And so on and so forth. We need people who want to be on the school board to make a difference and who meet those qualifications to do the job.”

Breed said the fundamental problem is getting kids back into the classroom and the board members were focusing on other matters that were clearly a distraction.

MORE NEWS: Calif. Assemblyman Kevin Kiley Discusses School COVID Mandates

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