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‘I’m Sorry’: After Defending Joe Rogan, Andrew Yang‘s Apologetic Reversal Is Part Of A Pattern

Earlier this week, former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang “entered the chat” that is the ongoing Joe Rogan podcast “scandal.” Yang posted multiple tweets in support of Rogan, but then proceeded to delete those same tweets hours later following a left-wing backlash. Yang additionally apologized for any “hurt” he may have caused.

“I don’t think Joe Rogan is a racist — the man interacts with and works with black people literally all of the time,” Yang posted to Twitter, in response to criticism regarding Rogan’s quotation of racial slurs.

“Do I know black friends of Joe’s who would swear by him? Yes I do,” he added.

Yang was immediately condemned by various left-wing figures and activists. For example, Democratic National Committee Chair Jaime Harrison replied, “Dude… seriously?! You joking right Andrew? Is that now the new defining line… working with folks?!”

Following the instant blowback, Yang deleted the two posts and issued an apology.

“I like to believe the best of people — especially if I’ve met and spent time with that person. Sometimes it makes me miss something. I think we should have the capacity to forgive people – whether a podcaster or a mayor — if they mess up. Maybe it’s because I mess up too,” Yang wrote. “Racism is real, deep, corrosive and even lethal. I know that. I made a mistake in an earlier tweet tonight that downplayed these realities.”

“I deleted the tweet because it was wrong-headed. It also hurt people, which is never my intent. I’m sorry. I’m learning and appreciate those who reached out to express their feelings,” he continued. “I like to believe the work I’ve done these past years had the goal of uplifting everyone, particularly those on the outside looking in for any reason, be it poverty or marginalization or race. I’ve always wanted to help those with the least the most.”

“I’m going to keep doing all I can for a more fair, equitable, and just country. That means for everyone. Universal Basic Income, Democracy Reform and unity are how we get there,” Yang concluded.

While Yang was criticized by both sides — by one for defending Rogan, and by the other for deleting and apologizing for his defense — it’s important to understand that this move is actually part of a pattern for the former presidential candidate.

As a New York City mayoral hopeful in May 2021, Yang expressed support for Israel after citizens in the Jewish state were being targeted by indiscriminate rocket fire by Hamas terrorists in Palestinian territory.

“I’m standing with the people of Israel who are coming under bombardment attacks, and condemn the Hamas terrorists,” Yang tweeted at the time. “The people of NYC will always stand with our brothers and sisters in Israel who face down terrorism and persevere.”

And just as was the case with his initial defense of Joe Rogan, Yang was immediately condemned from the left. #YangSupportsGenocide even started trending. 

“Utterly shameful for Yang to try to show up to Eid event after sending out a chest-thumping statement of support for a strike killing 9 children, especially after his silence as Al-Aqsa was attacked,” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez responded. “But then to try that in Astoria? During Ramadan?! They will let you know.”

Just one day later, Yang capitulated to the mob, apologizing for his tweet.

“I spoke to a group of volunteers for the campaign yesterday, some of whom have been with me for years. Many of them were upset with my recent tweet expressing solidarity with the people of Israel in conjunction with the violence in the region this week that has claimed the lives of innocents and children on both sides,” Yang wrote.

“They expressed to me that they follow and support me for a number of reasons, one is that I am a clear-headed person who follows facts. The other is that I am a human being who stands for universal values of fellowship and goodwill. They felt that my tweet was overly simplistic in my treatment of a conflict that has a long and complex history full of tragedies. And they felt it failed to acknowledge the pain and suffering on both sides,” Yang continued, adding, “They were, of course, correct.”

“I mourn for every Palestinian life taken before its time as I do for every Israeli. Suffering and pain and violence and death suffered by anyone hurts us all. All people want to be able to live in peace. We all want that for ourselves and our children,” Yang went on.

“Support of a people does not make one blind to the pain and suffering of others,” Yang wrote. “Again, most everyone simply wants to be able to live and pray in peace.”

“And that is what we want as well,” he continued. “I join with millions around the world in praying that the current situation be resolved as quickly as possible, peacefully and with minimal suffering.”

“For those who have spoken to me on this – thank you,” Yang concluded. “Continue to believe in humanity.”

For many, Yang’s strength in the face of pressure and his determination to push his system of beliefs was something that set him aside from others in the stereotypical political realm. His demonstrated pattern of 180-degree capitulation, however, might tear away this image, leaving supporters with just another politician whose strategy remains “one step forward, one step back.”

Ian Haworth is an Editor and Writer for The Daily Wire. Follow him on Twitter at @ighaworth.

The views expressed in this opinion piece are the author’s own and do not necessarily represent those of The Daily Wire.

The Daily Wire is one of America’s fastest-growing conservative media companies and counter-cultural outlets for news, opinion, and entertainment. Get inside access to The Daily Wire by becoming a member.

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